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Table 1 Characteristics of eligible studies on family planning interventions in urban slums

From: Family planning for urban slums in low- and middle-income countries: a scoping review of interventions/service delivery models and their impact

# Country Authors, publication year Study Aim Study design Family planning services FP service delivery model & intervention Population, sample, age Data collection methods
1 Bangladesh Huda et al.
2019 [21]
To assess the effectiveness of a married adolescent girls club in reducing the unmet need for family planning (FP) Quasi-experimental study Condom, injection, IUD, tubectomy, vasectomy, implant and pill Married Adolescent Girls’ (MAG) club intervention Married adolescent girls
Club
Sample = 1601
Age = 14–19
quantitative survey
2 Pakistan Hennink and Clements, 2005 [20] To determine the impact of new family planning clinics on knowledge, contraceptive use, and unmet need for family planning among married women in poor urban areas Quasi-experimental study Pill, condoms, injectables, the IUD, female sterilization procedures), pregnancy testing, termination of pregnancy, and advice about sexual health. Franchised Family Planning Clinics Age: <20–40+ Interviews; descriptive statistics,
3 Nicaragua Meuwissen et al.
2006 [25]
to identify the nature of existing unmet needs for SRH care through voucher redemption Cross-sectional study Oral, injectables, IUD and condoms Voucher scheme Sample: 3301
Age: 11–20
Structured questionnaire, descriptive statistics; multivariable analysis
4 India Achyut et al., 2016 [27] To evaluate the impact of the Urban Health Initiative Evaluation study (longitudinal sample of women and health facilities with baseline (2010) and endline (2014) data) Sterilization (female or male) IUD
Oral contraceptive pill Condom
Other modern method
Urban reproductive health initiative: women of reproductive age (15–49) women and the sub-sample of poor women interviewer administered facility audit, provider interviews and exit interviews
5 Senegal Benson et al. 2018 [28] To examine the impact of the Initiative’s demand- and supply-side activities on modern contraceptive use. Evaluation Baseline (2011) and endline (2015) longitudinal data Sterilization (female or male) IUD
Oral contraceptive pill Condom
Other modern method
Urban reproductive health initiative: women of reproductive age (15–49) women and the sub-sample of poor women interviewer administered facility audit, provider interviews and exit interviews
6 Kenya & Uganda Arur et al., 2009 [26] To improve use, responsiveness, and quality of FP and Safe Motherhood services and give clients a choice of providers. Technical report (review from published and unpublished secondary literature, primary data collection, and interviews) Implants, female sterilization, intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) Voucher scheme Poor women in urban centres secondary literature, primary data collection, and extensive interviews
7 Nigeria Krenn et al. 2014 [22] To determine the contribution of mobile services to total family planning services Quasi-experimental study N/A Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative Men and women of reproductive age Interviews, secondary data analysis, descriptive statistics
8 Ghana Henry et al., 2020 [24] To generate estimates of the effect of the Willows home-based counselling model as implemented in Kumasi, Ghana from 2013 to 2016 in order to guide future programming for community-based family planning behaviour-change interventions in urban Ghana and similar West African settings. Retrospective, cross-sectional design Male or female sterilization, intrauterine device, implants, injectables, oral contraceptive pills, male or female condoms, lactational amenorrhoea method and emergency contraception. The Willows reproductive health programme women who were between the ages of 16 and 44 in 2013
1836 women in each of the intervention and comparison areas, which we rounded up to a sample of 2000 women in each site.
Retrospectively assessed changes in women’s contraceptive use
Household survey
9 Bangladesh Uddin et al. 2012 [23] To assess the effectiveness of two models to provide primary healthcare (PHC) services to street-dwellers. Experimental pre-post design Condom, pill, and injection Static clinic and satellite clinics 800 (400 females and 400 males)
street-dwellers, ever-married females and males aged 15 years and above, living within the two-kilometre radius of the study locations; and were sleeping in the area for at least one week before data-collection.
Mixed method approach, a combination of both quantitative and qualitative techniques, was used for data-collection. The community survey and qualitative components (in-depth interviews with study subjects and healthcare providers)