Skip to main content

Table 4 Home sedentary behaviour environment according to parental educational level (analysis of variance and chi-square test)

From: Are associations between home environment and preschool children’s sedentary time influenced by parental educational level in a cross-sectional survey?

   Parental educational level  
Total Low Middle High  
Mean (SD)/% p-value
Physical home sedentary behaviour environment
 Number of screens in the household accessible to the child (n = 827) 5.00 (1.2) 4.96 (1.2) 5.01 (1.1) 5.03 (1.1) 0.80
Social home sedentary behaviour environment
Satisfaction
 The parent is satisfied with the child’s screen time (agree somewhat or strongly)a,b (n = 796) 69% 70% 69% 69% 0.98
Importance
 It is important for the parent to limit the child’s screen time (agree somewhat or strongly)c (n = 795) 86% 82% 86% 91% 0.01
Parent’s opinion about ‘suitable screen time’ (Descriptive norm for screen time)
 Suitable screen time per day for 3–6-year-old children: a maximum of 1 h (n = 797) 42% 41% 38% 50% 0.02
Role modelling for screen time
 Parent’s screen time in the presence of the child (hour/day)a (n = 797) 1.00 (0.7) 1.06 (0.9) 0.99 (0.7) 0.82 (0.6) 0.001
Rules
 Parent has rules limiting the child’s TV time (applies to families with a TV at home)d (n = 776) 75% 73% 77% 76% 0.57
 Parent has rules limiting child’s other screen time (applies to families with other screens besides TVs)d (n = 781) 79% 80% 78% 79% 0.91
  1. SD Standard deviation
  2. Statistically significant differences between parental educational level groups are in bold
  3. a Statements adapted from Gonzalez-Gil et al. [25] (modified, except the item marked with b)
  4. c Statement adapted from Lampard et al. [26] (modified)
  5. d Statements adapted from Pinard et al. [27]