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Table 3 Decomposition of changes in low SRHa rates for various samples of European countries, 2008–2011

From: What accounts for the rise of low self-rated health during the recent economic crisis in Europe?

  All EU countries Baltic countries
Estimate % of change in low SRH Estimate % of change in low SRH
Change in low SRH 1.935*** (0.514) 100 3.790*** (1.229) 100
Total “explained” effect (E) 1.802*** (0.291) 93.1 4.771*** (0.460) 125.9
Total “unexplained” effect (C) 0.133 (0.616) 6.9 −0.981 (1.325) −25.9
Individual characteristics effects
 Real equivalent income 0.205 (0.180) 10.6 0.372 (0.342) 9.8
 Poor 0.002 (0.023) 0.1 0.001 (0.073) 0.0
 Rich −0.000 (0.000) − 0.0 0.002 (0.002) 0.0
 Relatively poor 0.005 (0.010) 0.2 0.018 (0.043) 0.5
 Relatively rich 0.000 (0.003) 0.0 −0.065 (0.048) −1.7
 Material deprivation 0.224*** (0.019) 11.6 1.011*** (0.186) 26.7
 Employed full time 0.345*** (0.036) 17.8 1.332*** (0.115) 35.2
 Employed part time 0.168*** (0.028) 8.7 −0.184*** (0.046) −4.8
 Unemployed −0.104*** (0.024) −5.4 −0.734*** (0.114) −19.4
 Retired 0.091*** (0.031) 4.7 0.780*** (0.162) 20.6
 Disabled −0.028*** (0.002) −1.5 0.896*** (0.207) 18.0
 Inactive −0.059*** (0.015) −3.0 0.896*** (0.207) 23.6
 Other factorsb 0.955*** (0.322) 49.3 0.661*** (0.193) 17.4
 Observations 43,456 3719
  1. Standard errors clustered by country appear in parentheses; *p < 0.1, **p < 0.05, ***p < 0.01
  2. a: Low SRH is defined as the proportion of population with very bad, bad or fair SRH
  3. b: Other factors include sex, age, education, marital status, degree of urbanization and country dummies