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Table 4 VIHA cancer registry and hospital cancer separations summary statistics.

From: In the absence of cancer registry data, is it sensible to assess incidence using hospital separation records?

Registry n1 mean2 SD3 minimum4 maximum5
1990–1999 31,976 1.06 0.26 1 4
1990 2,780 1.02 0.13 1 2
1991 3,054 1.03 0.16 1 3
1992 3,179 1.02 0.14 1 3
1993 3,493 1.02 0.14 1 3
1994 3,210 1.02 0.14 1 2
1995 3,231 1.02 0.14 1 3
1996 3,423 1.03 0.17 1 3
1997 3,616 1.02 0.14 1 2
1998 3,538 1.03 0.16 1 3
1999 3,781 1.02 0.16 1 3
Hospital n 1 mean 2 SD 3 minimum 4 maximum 5
1990–1999 31,203 1.93 1.55 1 34
1990 4,031 1.55 1.10 1 22
1991 4,150 1.54 1.00 1 15
1992 4,252 1.51 0.93 1 12
1993 4,332 1.51 0.90 1 11
1994 4,010 1.47 0.87 1 13
1995 3,939 1.47 0.88 1 16
1996 3,947 1.45 0.91 1 15
1997 4,206 1.42 0.77 1 11
1998 4,067 1.39 0.77 1 15
1999 4,102 1.37 0.72 1 15
  1. For both datasets, the sum of unique study identification numbers each year over the study period will exceed the all-years total, because repeat individuals may span a number of years. For example, in the registry there are 110 study identification numbers in the ten-year period with three primary cancers, but only 15 record all three within a single year.
  2. 1 n total count of unique study identification numbers
  3. 2 mean average number of records per unique study identification number
  4. 3 SD standard deviation
  5. 4 minimum minimum observed records per unique study identification number
  6. 5 maximum maximum observed records per unique study identification number