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Table 1 Studies about the effect of economic crises on social inequalities in health

From: The impact of economic crises on social inequalities in health: what do we know so far?

Crisis Country Study period Reference Main health variable Main socioeconomic variable Analyses by sex Main results
Great recession United Kingdom 2006-2010 Astell-Burt & Feng [12] Limiting long-standing illness Working status No Inequalities in limiting long-standing illness decreased from 2008
United Kingdom 2004-2010 Harhay et al. [14] Binge drinking Working status; Income No The beginning of the crisis entailed an elevated risk of binge drinking among the unemployed. Income-related inequalities did not increase
United Kingdom 1991-2010 Katikireddi et al. [32] Mental health (GHQ-12) Educational level; deprivation level Yes Inequalities in mental health were already increasing before 2008
Spain 2006-2012 Rajmil et al. [15] Obesity; Health behaviours; Mental health; Heath-related quality of life Mothers’ educational level; Family’s working status No Inequalities in obesity among children did not change while inequalities in health-related quality of life increased
Spain 2006-2010 Gili et al. [11] Mental health Educational level; Working status No Excepting the decrease of working status related inequalities in dysthymia, inequalities increased in all other mental health indicators
Spain 2001-2011 Juárez et al. [27] Perinatal health Mothers’ educational level Only women Inequalities increased in macrosomia and in post-term births and did not increase in low birthweight and pre-term births
Spain 2006-2012 Bartoll et al. [24] Mental health (GHQ-12) Social class; Educational level Yes Inequalities increased only in men
Nordic crisis Finland 1981-1995 Valkonen et al. [20] Total and cause-specific mortality Social class Yes Inequalities were already increasing before the crisis, and continued growing afterwards
Finland 1986-1994 Lahelma et al. [18] Limiting long-standing illness; Self-perceived health Educational level; Working status Yes Inequalities decreased in men (especially regarding limiting long-standing illness), and remained stable in women
Finland 1993-2002 Lammintausta et al. [21] Incidence and mortality for coronary disease Income Yes Inequalities did not change during the period
Sweden 1986-1995 Lundberg et al. [22] Self-perceived health; Limiting long-standing illness Social class; Educational level; Working status Yes Inequalities did not change during the period
Nordic countries 1986-1995 Lahelma et al. [19] Self-perceived health; Limiting long-standing illness Working status; Educational level Yes Inequalities slightly decreased in men and did not change in women
Soviet Union crisis Russia 1980-2001 Murphy et al. [28] Life expectancy and mortality Educational level Yes Inequalities in life expectancy increased especially among men since 1990
Russia 1975-1998 Plavinski et al. [16] Total and cause-specific mortality Educational level No Inequalities increased during the 90s
Southeast Asian and Japanese crises Japan 1955-2000 Fukuda et al. [13] Life expectancy and mortality Income Yes Absolute inequalities decreased from 1970 to 1995 while increased afterwards
Japan 1986-2001 Kondo et al. [25] Self-perceived health Income; Social class Yes Inequalities did not change or slightly decreased in the population aged 40–60. In men, relative inequalities increased between middle-class non-manual and highest class workers
Japan 1986-2007 Kachi et al. [23] Self-perceived health Income Yes After 1998, inequalities decreased because poor self-perceived health increased more among the highest income groups
Korea 1993-2005 Son et al. [28] Life expectancy and mortality Educational level Yes Absolute inequalities in life expectancy at age 40 increased especially in men. Inequalities in mortality increased in the population aged 40-55
Korea 1995-2006 Kim et al. [31] Self-perceived health Social class; Working status Yes Working status inequalities increased in all social classes. Among non-professionals, inequalities increased especially in women
Korea 1998-2007 Hong et al. [17] Depression; Suicidal behaviour Income No Inequalities doubled in the period
Korea 1989-2000 Khang et al. [26] All-cause mortality; Self-perceived health Educational level Yes In men, inequalities in mortality remained stable while inequalities in self-perceived health increased in both sexes
Korea 1995-2005 Shim & Cho [30] Alcohol-attributable mortality Educational level; Social class Only men Inequalities increased in the period
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